Staffordshire Teapots


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Brown Betty Teapot, 6-Cup by HIC Harold Import Co.

  • Classic English Brown Betty Teapot. Still manufactured in Stoke on...
  • Pot shape allows for perfect infusion of tea leaves when water is...
  • Brown Betty design dates back to 1695.

$39.99

$41.99

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Product Description

During Queen Victoria's reign, tea became a symbol of Britain's greatest period of expansion and stability. Every home owned a teapot, even if it was a basic "Brown Betty". Tea was no longer a refined upper class beverage, but the basis of a whole meal. While Charleston dancers and many Victorian glamours have disappeared from the scene, the humble "Brown Betty" has remained a firm favorite. Its origins go back to the to the end of the 17th century and to the birth of the ceramic teapot. In 1700 a small unglazed teapot made of red clay from the Bradwell Woods area of Stoke on Trent was a luxury item costing 12 shillings. Our Brown Betty teapots are still made from the Terracotta as used by the Elder Brothers in 1695. their method of making was 'jollying' but in later years this became slip casting giving a smooth finish and even thickness. Rocking glaze complies with US FDA and California proposition 65. Succeeding generations of Englishmen have proved that the Brown Betty makes the best pot of tea in the world. The shape of the pot causes the tea leaves to be gently swirled around as the boiling water is added thus producing an exquisite infusion. The red terracotta clay with its Rockingham glaze coddles the brew and gives the perfect cup of tea.

James Sadler Teapots - Ivy House by James Sadler Teapots

  • This teapot holds 2 cups (20oz)
  • Made of fine bone china
  • Not recommended for microwave or dishwasher use.

$69.00

Product Description

Part of the Country Cottages collection, this Ivy House teapot by James Sadler is a collector's item, and holds 2 cups.Embellished in beautiful detail, this teapot features a different scene of the cottage on each side of the teapot. Incredible details adorn this teapot - from the dog sitting at the front door, to flowers on the window sills, furnature, and birds.This 2 cup (about 20oz) teapot measures 5 3/4" high x 8" wide, and is made of bone china. Not recommended for microwave or dishwasher use.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ycr1p16kHI

German Potters Adapting to an American Market by Rob Hunter

"German Potters Adapting to an American Market: Making Staffordshire Teapots in Wachovia" Rob Hunter, Editor of Ceramics in America, Yorktown, VA Art in .

The only art is Essex - Spectator.co.uk

When I went to visit Edward Bawden he vigorously denied that there were any modern painters in Essex. What is indisputable, however, is that there have been plenty of artists in the county. They are the subject of two small but delightfully jam-packed exhibitions at the Fry Art Gallery, Saffron Walden. Bawden (1903–1989) is at the heart of both of them, even if the second point he made to me — equally emphatically — was that he called himself a designer rather than an artist (‘out of self-defence, mainly’). That distinction, and the quirky humour, are both relevant to the question of Essex art, especially the variety that is the focus of attention at the Fry. From the early 1930s to the 1960s there was an informal artist’s colony in the north of the county, centred on the village of Great Bardfield. It included, among others, Bawden, his friend Eric Ravilious who lived for a while nearby at Castle Hedingham, plus the painters John Aldridge, Michael Rothenstein, Sheila Robinson and Walter Hoyle. This was as strongly flavoured in its way as the settlement of abstract artists on the other side of England, in St Ives beside the sea. Mondrian almost joined them, until he reflected that there was too much nature around in Cornwall and headed for New York instead. The Essex crowd, in contrast, were sturdily indigenous in their influences and revelled in the rural scene. Several of them devoted as much energy and attention to design — including interior design — as they did to painting pictures. Accordingly, one of the mini-exhibitions at the Fry is devoted to the houses of the Great Bardfield artists. These were decorated in an idiosyncratic manner, blending pieces of British folk art such as Staffordshire figures with items of their own design. Among the latter, the wallpapers by Bawden and Ravilious’s ceramics were outstanding. On show there is a dresser crammed with bits and pieces of old pottery, interspersed with Ravilious’s plates, teapots, bowls and mugs, produced by Wedgwood. Plenty of wallpaper is on display, by Bawden and also John Aldridge, all with an energy that must have made these rustic Georgian dwellings seem to fizz and crackle. ‘A good pattern is as good as a painting,’ Bawden told me. ‘I’d sooner have a good bit of William Morris than I would a lot of modern rubbish. ’ With him, you felt, this wasn’t entirely a joke: the design really was at the heart of what he did. And he was right: a square section from his wallpapers — Wood Pigeon ( c. 1925), for example — framed, makes a compelling picture. The houses, and gardens, quite often became subjects of art. One of the star items in the Fry Gallery’s collection is Ravilious’s watercolour of ‘The Attic Bedroom, Brick House’ ( c. 1932–34). This depicts the guest accommodation chez Bawden, where a most uncomfortable-looking camp bed shared the space with... Another display at the Fry groups numerous artists from the Bardfield area, starting from the point when Bawden discovered the place in 1932, while cycling around the countryside. Then, living there must have seemed like stepping into the 19th century. It was also cheap: ten shillings a week for a double-fronted Georgian house (later his father bought it for him as a wedding present). It ends with a plate by Grayson Perry, who lived in Bardfield as a teenager. On reflection — and unexpectedly — there are affinities between Perry and Bawden in a shared liking for making useful and decorative things and a pungent sense of humour. Art in Essex turns out to be an unexpectedly rich theme. Indeed, there is more — John Wonnacott’s Thames estuary landscapes, for example, or Cedric Morris’s art school at Dedham, attended by the teenaged Lucian Freud — to be explored. Currently the Fry Art Gallery is raising money to buy the freehold of the building it occupies, which strikes me as an excellent cause. Source: www.spectator.co.uk

Latest News

  • The only art is Essex

    08/27/15 ,via Spectator.co.uk

    When I went to visit Edward Bawden he vigorously denied that there were any modern painters in Essex. That may not have been true then — this was in the 1980s — or even now. What is indisputable, however, is that there have been plenty of artists in

  • Joe Rosson: Typical English-style tea set has ornamental decoration

    08/22/15 ,via Knoxville News Sentinel

    The bowl D. H. calls a "cold cocoa bowl" is more often called a "slop bowl" because it was meant to hold the debris from the teapot (occasionally, I have seen them used to hold whipped cream or even clotted cream). The set does appear to be unmarked

  • Exotic Creatures As Depicted By The Georgians Explored In New Exhibition

    08/18/15 ,via ArtLyst

    The exhibition will demonstrate how the arrival of exotic animals influenced fashion and the decorative arts in Britain, with giraffe-patterned wallpaper, teapots and fabrics becoming hugely popular in the late 1820s. It will also address the As

Recipes

Books

  • Staffordshire Pottery

    2015. 174 pages.
  • British Teapots and Coffee Pots

    Osprey Publishing. 2015. ISBN: 0747806349,9780747806349. 48 pages.

    ABOUT THE BOOK From the elegant to the quirky, teapots and coffee pots come in a range of styles and designs and are among the most familiar household items. Both decorative and easily displayed, they are very collectable and can be relatively inexpensive. In this book, Steven Goss charts their development over a period of three hundred years, providing information on the materials used in their manufacture, influential factories and designers, and a guide to dating the many different styles. * In the eighteenth century a pound of tea could cost more than a week's wages for a skilled craftsman. * Early coffee pots often have handles set at a right angle to the spout. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Steven Goss has been involved in the antiques trade for more than twenty-five years as a full-time...

Bing news feed

  • Joe Rosson: Typical English-style tea set has ornamental decoration

    08/22/15 ,via Knoxville News Sentinel

    calls a "cold cocoa bowl" is more often called a "slop bowl" because it was meant to hold the debris from the teapot (occasionally ... quite possibly from the Staffordshire region, and it was probably exported to Canada sometime in the late 1870s or ...

  • 10 best teapots

    08/15/15 ,via The Independent

    Snuggle up with a good cuppa and a scone or two (sold separately). Whether yours is Darjeeling, Earl Grey or good old-fashioned English Breakfast, brew it in a teapot too beautiful to cover with a cosie. 1. Blackberry Teapot: £29.50, marksandspencer.com ...

  • Pictures: Flash villagers celebrate a triple event

    06/21/15 ,via leek-news.co.uk

    Britain's highest village has staged a triple celebration of events. Despite the early morning rain, villagers in Flash enjoyed a successful historic teapot parade, well dressing and flower festival on Saturday. The day began with a short service at St ...

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Georgian, earthenware, pineapple design coffee pot, Staffordshire, 1750 - 1770, E107
Georgian, earthenware, pineapple design coffee pot, Staffordshire, 1750 - 1770, E107
Decorated coffee pot and cover in the shape of a pineapple For more information please go to blackcountryhistory.org/collections/getrecord/WAGMU_E107/
Photo by Black Country Museums on Flickr
Teapot
Teapot
Salt-glazed stoneware with enamel, ~1755, Staffordshire, England.
Photo by Maia C on Flickr
Porcelain teapot decorated with an exotic bird
Porcelain teapot decorated with an exotic bird
Hybrid hard paste porcelain teapot decorated with an exotic bird on a branch. There is no makers' mark but identified as possibly made by Thomas Wolfe, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire around 1810. HMCMS:CRH1950.10.31 DPAAMJ44
Photo by hantsculturaltrust on Flickr
From the Chipstone Collection–Staffordshire Teapots
From the Chipstone Collection–Staffordshire Teapots
Image by blog.mam.org
Gibson's Teapot | Staffordshire, England | 19th Century
Gibson's Teapot | Staffordshire, England | 19th Century
... 18th century Creamware pottery Teapot by Greatbach Staffordshire c1770
... 18th century Creamware pottery Teapot by Greatbach Staffordshire c1770